Breeders' Cup

Ellis banned from running horses in 2017 Breeders' Cup

The trainer Ron Ellis will not be allowed to enter any horses in the 2017 Breeders’ Cup under a formal adoption of a sanction by Breeders’ Cup on Tuesday regarding a positive test for a trace amount of an anabolic steroid after the Ellis-trained Masochistic finished second in the 2016 Sprint.

The 2017 prohibition, announced Tuesday by Breeders' Cup, will also apply to Masochistic under rules Breeders’ Cup adopted several years ago to project a tough stance on the use of medications and drugs in racing.

Masochistic to be disqualified from BC Sprint

Barbara D. Livingston
Masochistic will be disqualified from the Breeders' Cup Sprint due to small amounts of a legal steroid in his system.

Masochistic will be disqualified from his second-place finish in the Breeders’ Cup Sprint, and his trainer, Ron Ellis, faces a potential penalty from the California Horse Racing Board after two separate tests confirmed small amounts of a legal steroid in the horse’s system, Ellis said Monday.

Road to the Derby: Breeders' Cup Juvenile analysis

Grade 1, $2 million Breeders’ Cup Juvenile; 1 1/16 miles; Santa Anita; Nov. 5, 2016

Road to the 2017 Kentucky Derby: Breeders' Cup Juvenile analysis

Emily Shields
Classic Empire confirmed his status as the season's top 2-year-old by winning the Breeders' Cup Juvenile.

Grade 1, $2 million Breeders’ Cup Juvenile, 1 1/16 miles, Santa Anita, Nov. 5, 2016

 (20 Derby qualifying points for a win, 8 for second, 4 for third, 2 for fourth)

 Winner: Classic Empire, by Pioneerof the Nile

 Trainer: Mark Casse

 Jockey: Julien Leparoux

 Owner: John Oxley

 Beyer Speed Figure: 102

Breeders' Cup Sprint purse yet to be paid out

Barbara D. Livingston
Drefong, ridden by Martin Garcia, wins the Breeders' Cup Sprint by 1 1/4 lengths on Nov. 5.

DEL MAR, Calif. – The purse for the $1.5 million Breeders’ Cup Sprint has yet to be released, though the other 12 Breeders’ Cup races have had their purses released, the California Horse Racing Board said on Wednesday.

Purses are often held up if there is an issue with a post-race test. Asked if that was the case regarding the Sprint, Mike Marten, a spokesman for the racing board, said, “We cannot comment.”

Tamarkuz retired to stand at owner's farm

Barbara D. Livingston
Tamarkuz, with Mike Smith aboard, wins the Breeders' Cup Dirt Mile by 3 1/2 lengths Friday.

Tamarkuz earned a place at stud at his owner’s farm when he won the Grade 1 Breeders’ Cup Dirt Mile at Santa Anita on Friday. Three days after the biggest victory of his career, it was announced that he would take up residence at Sheikh Maktoum’s Shadwell Farm in Lexington, Ky., for the 2017 breeding season. The son of Speightstown will stand for a fee of $12,500.

Hovdey: Battle to Arrogate, but Chrome's still a war hero

In show business, it’s how you leave ’em that counts – laughing, crying, wanting even more. Last Saturday’s Day 2 of the Breeders’ Cup provided all that and then some.

Brilliant races from Arrogate, California Chrome, Highland Reel, and Tourist marked the day, while Peter Eurton, Phil D’Amato, Seamus Heffernan, and Flavien Prat joined the company of Breeders’ Cup winners.

Bernick's BCBC dream comes up short

Craig Bernick of Glen Hill Farm made a tremendous run at the Breeders’ Cup Betting Challenge. Heading to the Classic he sat third with $56,042.50. He liked California Chrome, and he was willing to risk his whole bankroll. Still, with two players ahead of him, he had a decision to make: Which pool should he attack?

Breeders' Cup clarifies picture for most Eclipse Awards

ARCADIA, Calif. – The victory by Arrogate in the Breeders’ Cup Classic on Saturday was one of several results last week at Santa Anita that should have a significant impact on the year-end Eclipse Awards.

Sparkman: A new golden age for American Thoroughbred racing?

Emily Shields
Arrogate, by Unbridled's Song, gets by California Chrome to win the Breeders' Cup Classic.

The 15 years or so from the mid-1960s through the end of the 1970s is rightly regarded as the Golden Age of American Thoroughbred racing. Beginning with the Kentucky Derby and Preakness victories of Northern Dancer in 1964, the following decade and a half produced a steady stream American-bred horses with credentials both on the racetrack and in the breeding shed that rival or surpass the all-time greats of the Thoroughbred breed.

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