Updated on 12/21/2015 9:06AM

Successful sire Scat Daddy dies suddenly at 11

Email
Barbara D. Livingston
Ashford Stud's Scat Daddy died at age 11.

The prominent young sire Scat Daddy died of a suspected cardiac event Monday at Coolmore’s Ashford Stud in Versailles, Ky. The son of Johannesburg was 11.

"Scat Daddy was in the best of health, but totally unexpectedly, he dropped dead when walking out of his paddock,” Ashford manager Dermot Ryan said. “Everyone here at Ashford is very upset as he was a smashing horse with a great career ahead of him.”

Scat Daddy won multiple graded stakes in both seasons he raced for owner James Scatuorchio and trainer Todd Pletcher, taking the Grade 1 Champagne and Grade 2 Sanford as a juvenile and the Grade 1 Florida Derby and Grade 2 Fountain of Youth as a 3-year-old. He finished unplaced in the 2007 Kentucky Derby, the final start of his career. In all, he captured five of nine starts, earning more than $1.3 million.

From five crops of racing age to date, Scat Daddy’s progeny has earned more than $32.3 million and won 70 stakes, led by multiple Grade 1 winner Lady of Shamrock, Group 1 winner No Nay Never, and multiple graded stakes winners such as Daddy Long Legs, Handsome Mike, Daddy Nose Best, Frac Daddy, and Dice Flavor.

Scat Daddy leads the North American general sire list by stakes winners and ranks second on the juvenile sire list by earnings, trailing only Coolmore’s breakout freshman sire, Uncle Mo. Scat Daddy’s season was led by the multiple graded stakes winner El Kabeir, who is targeting the Grade 1 Malibu Stakes at Santa Anita next week; Grade 1 winner Nickname; and multiple graded stakes winner Pretty N Cool.

Scat Daddy also was a popular shuttle sire for Coolmore, finishing as the leading sire in Chile in 2013 and 2014. He is the sire of champions Il Campione, Dacita, Solaria, and El Bromista in that country. Dacita, now based in the U.S., was a graded stakes winner at Saratoga this year to bolster her sire’s résumé.

Scat Daddy stood the 2015 breeding season for a fee of $35,000 and was scheduled to stand for $100,000 in 2016.
 

VICTOR More than 1 year ago
But you couldn't go from $ 35K to $100K without hemisphere shuttle>> Bet on thru current runners , maybe his progeny will be even better >>>>>>>>>>>
Ray Sousa More than 1 year ago
These stallions get the best possible care possible .the overseas facility's are as good if not better than ours. horses pass away before their time just like people.it is completely stupid to try to overanalyze and try to pin blame on shuttling. hundreds of these stallions shuttle back and forth for years with no problems. Others had never left Kentucky and died early. Back in the day the English also had these ideas of superiority and felt their horses would be damaged if shipped inferior stud farms in the states. fortunately we got their stallions.
slewofdamascus More than 1 year ago
top juvenile sire because his foals had size and scope early, a real loss hopefully an autopsy will reveal something that will help prevent future deaths.
Caroll Del Muro Haircolor More than 1 year ago
Where was Harlan's Holiday when he passed? Brazil? Chile?
Gaye Goodwin More than 1 year ago
Brazil, I think, but his death was not cardiac arrest; his more more horrific
Ray Sousa More than 1 year ago
actually it was Argentina completely different from brazil including the language . and it was not more horrific he came back from a routine covering of a mare and collapsed in his stall .prolapsed intestine.
Gaye Goodwin More than 1 year ago
And you don't consider a prolapsed intestine horrific? Perhaps you would like to have your guts spilling out...
John Boyes More than 1 year ago
Terrible news ! He sure was gaining a name for turf runners . RIP ~
Eleanor Sniegowski More than 1 year ago
Still think that shuttling these sires and having them breed that much cant be good in the long term.
mike More than 1 year ago
Agreed
Judith Donlan More than 1 year ago
I agree as well. All the traveling in addition to the changes of seasons, environments, new caretakers, feed, will take its toll in many ways, not necessarily all cardiac linked. I don't think we have studied the physiological changes that occur in this type of environmental impact enough. Colic seems to be the biggest problem but we don't know what the precursors of the disease are. I don't know the statistics regarding deaths of stallions serving overseas but it appears to be an abnormally high incidence just on the "face" of observations. I'm sure someone will reply with some real statistics.
slewofdamascus More than 1 year ago
toally agreed
Gaye Goodwin More than 1 year ago
I agree, but I would suspect his early demise would have started with the rampant steroid usage that was legal when he went through the sale and then raced. Subsequent shuttling probably didn't help, exposing and fostering any weakness.
weffiexxx More than 1 year ago
You are absolutely correct . These stud places r awful