04/23/2012 1:36PM

Schwartz eyes Preakness for The Lumber Guy

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Adam Coglianese/NYRA
The Lumber Guy scores a front-running, 2 3/4-length victory in the Grade 2 Jerome.

ELMONT, N.Y. – Owner Barry Schwartz is leaving the door open for Jerome winner The Lumber Guy to make his next start in the $1 million Preakness Stakes at Pimlico on May 19.

“It’s definitely a possibility,” Schwartz said Monday by phone from Southern California.

The other possibility is the Grade 2, $200,000 Peter Pan, a one-turn 1 1/8-mile race at Belmont Park on May 12.

The Lumber Guy bounced back from his fifth-place finish in the Wood Memorial on April 7 with a front-running, 2 3/4-length victory over fellow New York-bred Brigand in Saturday’s Grade 2, $200,000 Jerome at Aqueduct. He ran the one-turn mile in 1:36.04 and earned a 95 Beyer Speed Figure.

“It reminded me of why I’m in the horse business,” Schwartz said. “One day like that can make up for a bad week, month, or year. He really had a horrible trip in the Wood. This race really vindicated him. He’s a really nice horse.”

Schwartz said that trainer Mike Hushion was “very happy” with how well The Lumber Guy came out of the race.

“For Mike to be very happy, that’s big,” Schwartz said.

Schwartz said he and Hushion would evaluate how the fields for the Preakness and Peter Pan are shaping up before making a final decision.

“I’m very open-minded about it,” Schwartz said. “We’ll see which spot fits him best.”

This Saturday, Schwartz and Hushion will send out Bold Deed, The Lumber Guy’s 4-year-old older brother, in the Grade 3, $150,000 Westchester Stakes at Belmont.

avlamal More than 1 year ago
lumberguy is nothing time will prove me right he was coming off the 2 week mile and a eighth compared to the distance lacking competitors watch and c
TravisStone More than 1 year ago
I'd go Peter Pan. He ran well this weekend, but they came home slow... it'll be hard for him to stretch-out in a race like the Preakness. Peter Pan is a better step IMO.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Agreed. He's a good horse, but possibly better suited to the one-turn mile (and an eighth, in this case) than the Preakness.