01/31/2003 12:00AM

Md. breeding: First crops starting to make the scene

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Some of Maryland's first-year stallions already have foals on the ground.

The first foal for Mojave Moon, who stands at Bonita Farm, was born on Jan. 6, and five more have arrived in the past three weeks.

"Mares were cycling early last year, and he was bred to a bunch of maiden mares," said Billy Boniface, in charge of Bonita's breeding operation.

Mojave Moon's first foal is a colt out of Belle's Good Cide, a mare purchased by Bonita Farm at the 2001 Fasig-Tipton December mixed sale for $3,500 (barren). Belle's Good Cide, who sold for $100,000 at Keeneland January in 2000, has turned out to be an extremely good buy - last year her son Funny Cide came to the races and won all three of his starts at 2, including the Sleepy Hollow and Bertram F. Bongard Stakes at Belmont Park.

Mojave Moon proved extremely popular his first season at stud, covering 67 mares while standing for $7,500. A graded-stakes-placed runner, the 7-year-old Mojave Moon boasts an impeccable pedigree - being a son of Mr. Prospector out of champion East of the Moon, a daughter of the renowned champion Miesque. East of the Moon, by Private Account, has produced three stakes horses from three runners and is a half-sister to Kingmambo, a classic winner and top sire, and stakes winner Miesque's Son.

Disco Rico, a Maryland-bred champion at 3 and the statebred champion sprinter of 2001, has his first foal at Murmur Farm, just a few miles down the road from Bonita Farm in Darlington, Md.

Born on Jan. 21, the foal is a dark bay colt out of maiden mare Diva's Quest, a daughter of Norquestor and stakes winner Irish Ivor. Bred by Henry DiRico, the colt is one of about a dozen Disco Rico foals expected at Murmur this spring, says Audrey Murray, who owns and operates the farm along with her husband, Allen.

Disco Rico was bred to 54 mares in 2002. A handsome bay, he competed for Alfred DiRico over three seasons, winning nine of his 17 starts, with seven of his victories coming in stakes.

One of Disco Rico's biggest victories came on Preakness Day in 2001, when he rolled home by nearly three lengths in the Grade 3 Maryland Breeders' Cup Handicap. A son of top Maryland sire Citidancer, Disco Rico earned $532,244. Out of the stakes-placed Apalachee mare Round It Off from the family of champion Smoke Glacken, Disco Rico stands for $4,000 live foal.

Expected soon are the first foals of Jazz Club, who entered stud a few weeks after the start of the 2002 breeding season. Even with a slightly abbreviated season, Jazz Club covered 60 mares at Shamrock Farms in Woodbine, Md.

A multiple graded stakes-winning son of Dixieland Band, Jazz Club has The Garden Club as his second dam, and she also appears in the pedigrees of Grade 1 winners Runup the Colors, Prospectors Delite, and Tomisue's Delight. Jazz Club stands for $3,500.

Gyrfalcon joins William's Grove

Gyrfalcon, a winning son of champion Zafonic out of group winner Monroe (by Sir Ivor), has entered stud at William's Grove Farm in Chesapeake City, said William Rickman Sr., owner of William's Grove. "This horse is beautiful," Rickman said. "And it's hard to find a better pedigree."

Bred by Juddmonte Farms in England, Gyrfalcon is a full brother to Xaar, a two-time Group 1 winner and 2-year-old champion in Europe. Their dam, Monroe, has also produced group winners Masterclass, who was second in the Group 1 Grand Criterium at 2, and Diese, the dam of Senure, a winner of the Grade 1 United Nations Handicap.

Gyrfalcon joins Dumyat, another beautifully bred horse from Juddmonte's remarkable breeding operation, to stand at William's Grove. When Dumyat went to stud at William's Grove last year, Rickman purchased a number of mares to breed to him. The first of those offspring are due to arrive within the next month.

Dumyat, a son of Rahy out of Northern Dancer's daughter Dokki, is a half-brother to Grade 1 winners Aptitude and Sleep Easy from the family of champion Slew o' Gold.

Rickman noted that both Gyrfalcon and Dumyat were injured early in their career and weren't able to show their true ability. The two stand for private contract.