09/17/2006 11:00PM

Lost in the Fog euthanized

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Eclipse champion sprinter Lost in the Fog was euthanized Sunday at 5 p.m., one month after the discovery of cancerous tumors in his spleen and abdomen.

The 4-year-old colt went into distress in his stall Sunday after his usual morning walk with trainer Greg Gilchrist. After eating, the colt experienced severe abdominal pain and lay down.

Gilchrist and veterinarian Dr. Donald Smith were able to get the colt back on his feet with some difficulty.

The colt was sedated with a pain killer but showed signs of suffering as the pain killer wore off, and the decision was made to euthanize him.

Lost in the Fog underwent the first of six scheduled chemotherapy treatments at the University of California Davis School of Veterninary Medicine on Sept. 7.

He had been hand walked daily since his return to his stall at Golden Gate Fields by Gilchrist, who would take him from his stall each morning and allow him to graze on a grass patch in front of a neighboring barn.

"Greg and I had long talks and set up some well-defined parameters of what we would do," Dr. Smith said. "We didn't want the horse to suffer."

Smith said the end came peacefully for the colt, who was attended by he and Gilchrist.By CHUCK DYBDAL

Eclipse champion sprinter Lost in the Fog was euthanized Sunday at 5 p.m., one month after the discovery of cancerous tumors in his spleen and abdomen.

The 4-year-old colt went into distress in his stall Sunday after his usual morning walk with trainer Greg Gilchrist. After eating, the colt experienced severe abdominal pain and lay down.

Gilchrist and veterinarian Dr. Donald Smith were able to get the colt back on his feet with some difficulty.

The colt was sedated with a pain killer but showed signs of suffering as the pain killer wore off, and the decision was made to euthanize him.

Lost in the Fog underwent the first of six scheduled chemotherapy treatments at the University of California Davis School of Veterninary Medicine on Sept. 7.

He had been hand walked daily since his return to his stall at Golden Gate Fields by Gilchrist, who would take him from his stall each morning and allow him to graze on a grass patch in front of a neighboring barn.

"Greg and I had long talks and set up some well-defined parameters of what we would do," Dr. Smith said. "We didn?t want the horse to suffer."

Smith said the end came peacefully for the colt, who was attended by he and Gilchrist.