11/23/2001 12:00AM

Dutrow colt gets 2nd chance

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JAMAICA, N.Y. - When Anthony Dutrow shipped Saratoga Way to New York for a maiden race in September, he was expecting a big performance out of the colt, based on the way he had trained.

Early on, Saratoga Way was sitting a perfect trip behind dueling leaders. But when jockey Rick Wilson asked Saratoga Way to run turning for home, the Unaccounted For colt came up empty and finished eighth, beaten 12 3/4 lengths. After bouncing back to win a maiden race by nearly nine lengths at Laurel, Saratoga Way is once again headed to New York, where he will run in Sunday's $75,000 Huntington Stakes for juveniles going six furlongs at Aqueduct.

Once again, Dutrow - who finished second in this race last year with Native Heir - has high hopes for Saratoga Way.

"I took him to New York because I thought he'd run well," Dutrow said of Saratoga Way's New York maiden race. "He bled in the race. We got him on Lasix and I ran him at Laurel and he ran the way he had trained. He's trained excellent since. He's got a lot of talent. He can run and I like him."

Dutrow admits that Saratoga Way didn't beat much in his maiden win, but there are certainly no standouts among the eight entered in the Huntington, the last juvenile stakes of the year for open company in New York. Saratoga Way will break from post 5 under Mario Pino.

Saratoga Way had things his own way on the front end in his maiden win, but will probably have to contend with Volley Ball and Harmony Hall on Sunday.

Volley Ball, trained by Ben Perkins Jr., comes back one week after finishing third as the favorite in the $50,000 Pennsylvania Futurity at Philadelphia Park. Prior to that, he had won his first two starts in front-running fashion.

The horse to beat may be Iron Deputy, who made his debut in the same race as Saratoga Way, running second after blowing a three-length lead in the stretch. He came back a month later to win his maiden by

2 3/4 lengths in a race that featured highly regarded Dubai Tiger.

"He made too big a move around the turn, plus I thought he might have been one work short before he ran," trainer Jimmy Jerkens said of Iron Deputy's debut.

In his second start, Jerkens said, Iron Deputy "broke better. He was down on the inside, but [jockey Richard Migliore] waited before swinging him out."

Iron Deputy has since come back with a solid five-furlong move in 1:00.20 and should appreciate breaking from the outside post.

Completing the field are J's Wild Slew, Mr. Kipp, Parfy's Legacy, and

R B's Boy.