11/02/2013 1:36PM

Breeders' Cup Dirt Mile: Goldencents targets Malibu

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Barbara D. Livingston
Goldencents, with Rafael Bejarano up, scores a front-running win in the Breeders' Cup Dirt Mile.

ARCADIA, Calif. – Goldencents, the dominant winner of the $1 million Breeders’ Cup Dirt Mile on Friday at Santa Anita, could make his next start in the Grade 1 Malibu on Dec. 26 at Santa Anita, trainer Doug O’Neill said Saturday morning.

Goldencents, ridden by Rafael Bejarano, seized the lead from his outside post early in the first turn of the Dirt Mile before opening a huge lead in the upper stretch and coasting to a 2 3/4-length triumph over late-running Golden Ticket. Goldencents earned a 105 Beyer Speed Figure.

The Malibu, the traditional opening-day feature of the winter-spring meet at Santa Anita, is run at seven furlongs.

As for Golden Ticket, trainer Ken McPeek said he was very pleased with how the 4-year-old colt closed from 10th and that he is considering running him back in the Nov. 29 Clark Handicap at his home track of Churchill Downs, or the Nov. 30 Cigar Mile at Aqueduct. Both are Grade 1 races.

Brujo de Olleros, third-place finisher in the Dirt Mile, will be flown Tuesday to Ocala, Fla., and “have about 10 days of rest,” according to Barry Irwin of owner Team Valor International.

“We’re looking at probably stretching him out this winter and trying the Donn Handicap,” Irwin said. The Donn will be run on Feb. 8 at Gulfstream Park.

Verrazano, fourth as the 5-2 favorite in the field of 11, is being retired to Ashford Stud. The 3-year-old colt ends his racing career with a 6-for-9 mark, with his biggest wins coming in the Grade 1 Wood Memorial and Grade 1 Haskell Invitational.

Meanwhile, Centralinteligence, who was eased down the stretch, suffered a condylar fracture of his right front cannon bone and was scheduled to undergo surgery Sunday morning, trainer Ron Ellis said. Dr. Wayne McIlraith will perform the surgery.

“It’s not life-threatening, and it doesn’t necessarily have to be career-threatening,” Ellis said. “Typically it’s the kind of injury you need about a year to evaluate where you are. Thankfully, the horse is doing okay.”

Ellis surmised Centralinteligence suffered the injury on the first turn when he was checked sharply in traffic.