05/30/2013 11:41AM

In Belmont Stakes, Albarado out to restore reputation

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Barbara D. Livingston
Robby Albarado, who rode Golden Soul to a surprise runner-up finish in the Kentucky Derby, hopes another big effort in the June 8 Belmont Stakes will help him land more mounts in major events.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. – Robby Albarado has regrets, but who doesn’t? His mounts once earned nearly $20 million in a year, but at age 39 he is no longer among the national riding leaders, a fact partly attributable, by his own admission, to mistakes he made.

Those mistakes – back-to-back domestic-violence charges − brought him legal problems and embarrassment, not to mention a major slowdown in his riding business. They are part of his personal history. Yet, with every day, they move further into the past while Albarado is doing all he can to atone.

“I know who I am,” Albarado said in a recent interview just outside the jockeys’ quarters at Churchill Downs, his longtime base. “My true friends, my kids, they know who I am. Until enough time passes that other people can know that for themselves, I’ve got to be content with knowing in my heart that I’m a good person. There’s really nothing else I can do except show people every day that that’s true.”

As the 145th Belmont Stakes approaches, Albarado is working quietly but diligently to restore his reputation to where it once was, when he was widely acclaimed as the regular rider of Mineshaft, the 2003 Horse of the Year, and Curlin, the 2007-08 Horse of the Year. Albarado will ride Golden Soul in the June 8 Belmont, a race that offers a return to an international spotlight that eluded him a little more than two years ago when he was replaced the day before Animal Kingdom won the 2011 Kentucky Derby with John Velazquez aboard for Team Valor International.

“That one hurt bad,” he said.

Albarado lost the mount after suffering a broken nose and other facial injuries when kicked by a horse in a post-parade accident at Churchill several days before the Derby. Velazquez, who became available only after the scratch of morning-line favorite Uncle Mo, was named by Team Valor president Barry Irwin to replace Albarado, who was sufficiently healthy to win the Grade 1 Humana Distaff aboard Sassy Image on the Derby undercard.

“That was the hard part,” he said. “Showing I could ride and still being named off.”

The pain of losing a Derby-winning ride, however, was markedly different from what he and his then-wife, Kimber, had suffered just weeks beforehand in a much-publicized domestic incident that led to a divorce and to Albarado being dragged into court.

The events at the Albarado household in the Lake Forest neighborhood of Louisville on the night of March 31, 2011, led Kimber to file domestic-violence charges against Robby. According to the police, Kimber had strangulation marks around her neck but declined medical treatment. She eventually dropped the charges and an emergency protective order less than three weeks later. About two weeks after the charges were dropped, Albarado lost the Derby mount on Animal Kingdom.

Fast forward one year − on the morning of the Kentucky Oaks, May 4, 2012, Albarado was arrested again on domestic-violence charges made by then-girlfriend Carolina Martinez in what later was described in court as a pushing-and-shoving brouhaha involving a cell phone. Martinez was treated for an injured shoulder and bruising to her legs, according to the police.

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Virtually all of Albarado’s friends and business associates quickly distanced themselves from him – his agent, Lenny Pike Jr., stepped aside after 16 years of representing Albarado – and he was suspended indefinitely by the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission until the matter could be legally addressed. After securing an injunction, he was allowed to resume riding June 1, 2012, at Arlington Park.

To this day, Albarado stands guilty of fourth-degree assault from the second domestic incident, with the only penalty a $500 fine. Albarado, through his attorneys, has had the verdict under appeal since a decision was rendered by a jury in Jefferson Circuit Court in Louisville on July 12, 2012. Marc Guilfoil, the KHRC’s deputy executive commissioner, said in an e-mail that once a decision is made on the appeal Albarado will be required to appear before the licensing review panel.

In the meantime, he has been cleared to ride in all jurisdictions, including Kentucky, Illinois, Louisiana, and wherever he has applied.

The most damning part, of course, has been the stigma. Albarado has heard and read it all: wife-beater, abuser, bully, and worse. He says he believes that both incidents were blown out of proportion, especially by the media and by uninformed people, and that he was deemed guilty in the court of public opinion before being able to prove his innocence. He says no punches were thrown, no overt violence perpetrated, no knife or gun produced, that no one’s life was seriously threatened, “nothing even remotely close,” he said, and that his status as a wealthy, well-known jockey made him an inviting target.

At the same time, Albarado said he recognizes the letter of the law − that in fact bodily contact was made, that it was within the rights of the women to press charges, and that his best response is to be contrite and open about it. He is aware that any pleas for forgiveness from the public are apt to be met with scorn, not sympathy.

“The bottom line is, yes, my actions were wrong,” he said. “But I can honestly say that I have never, ever hit a woman in my life. Not then, not now. Never.

“It’s all in the past now. I can only let time prove that the negative perceptions of me as a person are wrong.”

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Albarado completed court-ordered alcohol and anger-management classes, and perhaps more important, he has taken the initiative to make what he described as “important changes” in his lifestyle, ones that diminish the chances of such ugly incidents occurring again.

“Now I think further ahead about where I’m going and who I’m going with, knowing that people are watching me and maybe wanting me to mess up again,” he said. “I’ve got different friends, different places I go. Right now I have to be as private as I can. And I’m a lot more prioritized with my kids than I ever was.”

Albarado shares custody of his three children – ages 12, 9, and 6 – with Kimber. They live within minutes of each other in the Lake Forest area. Kimber did not return a phone message seeking comment for this article.

Albarado said he also has been in a committed relationship for more than a year with a young woman who lives about an hour away in Lexington.

Albarado said his overall attitude is upbeat because “pain, for everyone, is inevitable. Misery is optional. I’m not the kind of person to let pain keep me down for very long.”

Dallas Stewart, the trainer of Golden Soul and a longtime friend of Albarado’s, is a big supporter.

“We all deal with ‘today,’ ” Stewart said. “I’ve been around Robby a long time – and his kids since they were born. They were all over at my house the other night. They love their dad very much, and he’s going to be there for them. I’m very hopeful for him, and that doesn’t have anything to do with riding a horse. Like anybody else, you just try to figure things out as you go.”

Mark Bacon, a horse owner described by Albarado as his closest personal friend, said he strongly believes the jockey has been pro-active in trying to become a prominent citizen again.

“Robby has admittedly made some mistakes,” Bacon said. “But I hope he continues to rebuild his character and can focus on being the world-class jockey we all know he is.”

Albarado’s personal life in the last couple of years not only has relegated his riding feats into a distant background, but also his charitable deeds. Funding sources for the Robby Albarado Foundation – which has distributed about $150,000 to the families of needy children in Louisville since its 2007 founding, according to Brad Moore, treasurer of the foundation – abruptly dried up in the wake of all the negativity.

“That’s what makes me feel the worst about the fallout from all this,” he said. “The kids aren’t getting my help any longer. I’d like to turn that back around real soon. I have a real passion for that and I’m very proud of it.”

As for his career, the ride on Golden Soul was lauded as perhaps the savviest of the Derby. Albarado saved ground, avoided trouble, and finished strongly, with Golden Soul outrunning his 34-1 odds in finishing second to Orb.

It was the kind of ride to be expected from someone who has built an extraordinary career since he began riding horses at age 12 in the Louisiana bayou. In nearly 23 years, Albarado has won more than 4,500 races, with his mounts earning more than $180 million. His résumé includes victories aboard Curlin in the Preakness (2007), Breeders’ Cup Classic (2007), and Dubai World Cup (2008); the prestigious George Woolf Memorial Award (2004); and two years when his mount earnings were second-most in North America ($19.3 million in 2007 and $14.2 million in 2008).

By comparison, his mount earnings in 2012 were $4.5 million, his lowest total since his career arc was still ascending in 1995.

Naturally, Albarado continues to want to ride in the Triple Crown series, the Breeders’ Cup, and as many major events as possible while also acknowledging that it will take time for more horsemen and fans to warm up to him again. A big run from Golden Soul in the Belmont next Saturday could help toward his goals.

“I’m just out here trying to do the very best I can with my life,” he said. “It’s all any of us can do.”


Albarado year-by-year

Year Mounts Wins Earnings
2013 342 55 $2,758,832
2012 812 101 4,529,571
2011 675 69 5,839,312
2010 1,070 176 10,272,324
2009 1,148 204 11,504,625
2008 1,240 250 14,190,917
2007 1,260 252 19,359,049
2006 1,069 175 9,858,290
2005 1,164 204 10,717,254
2004 1,309 213 10,372,173
2003 1,123 185 11,061,314
2002 1,374 270 10,181,703
2001 1,401 273 10,651,669
2000 1,054 203 8,341,563
1999 1,421 249 10,799,785
1998 1,468 269 9,366,585
1997 1,414 240 7,023,202
1996 1,550 276 5,294,534
1995 1,513 236 4,276,046
1994 1,427 172 2,235,205
1993 1,327 158 812,485
1992 1,314 167 458,125
1991 876 81 282,872
1990 465 27 126,942
Total 27,816 4,505 $180,314,377

 

Elijah Allison More than 1 year ago
Definitely has a live mount with golden soul hope you reel em in!!! Picken em up and laying em down!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I wish him well in putting it behind him, but his approach, of admitting enough guilt to stay as close to good graces as he can, while not really admitting that yes, he did put his hands on his exes, leaves me a little cold. I understand this is a game of appearances, and that the cleaner his appearance, the closer he gets to forgiveness in the business, but at the same time, I can't help but feel it's all a bit calculated. It's his business, and we'll never know what went on both times, but domestic violence is rightfully a stigma. Falling on just enough of your sword to still look good just isn't enough.
A Yahoo! User More than 1 year ago
How the do YOU know that he DID put his hands on those women? You werent there! Even you contradicted yourself by saying "yes, he did put his hands on his exes" & then saying "It's his business, and we'll never know what went on both times". Robby I wish the best to you!
russell More than 1 year ago
I've said this a dozen times, jocks are the least important factor in this game. When a top trainer like Allen Jerkens routinely used no name jocks like Shanon Uske, Noel Wynter, Jean Luc Samyn, etc the point is proven. And if you are a wife beater you deserve no mercy.
Hayley Baker More than 1 year ago
You have to be a shallow person to wish this guy well. Sad
Hayley Baker More than 1 year ago
Seriously, the guy doesnt even take responsibility for what he's done. Its always "oh it was blown out of proportion...twice". If Albarado is a "good person" than i dont know who isnt. Everyone must qualify then. What a loser
Justin More than 1 year ago
You just don't touch a woman! It is as simple as that and the fact that he has two separate women claiming basically the same abuse has to make you wonder.. Where there is smoke, there is usually fire.
Susan More than 1 year ago
McGee seems sympathetic to Albarado. So do many other people. I wonder how many would be similarly moved had the accusation been on abusing horses. Jockeys are the most visible of horsemen, and by default the ambassadors of goodwill of the racing industry. Jockeys and trainers are marketers of themselves. Presentation is just as important as talent. Trainers are probably keen to this and leery of owners/clients feelings on the allegations, and not be judged by association. There are many other options Alabardo has to repair his reputation. He can be a spokeman against domestic violence and even though he says he thinks the public would not accept an apology, he doesn't even try it to regain a fraction of the confidence losin him. All in all, his quotes in the article scream denial.
Sal Carcia More than 1 year ago
I have always liked Robby as a rider and it always appeared that he had his act together. My sense is the public and racing community are always open to forgiving riders for their human failings. But, I do worry that he is not totally well yet. There appears to be some denial going on here. I hope I am wrong.
Jcarroll Barnhill More than 1 year ago
THERE IS NO QUESTION OF HIS RIDING ABILITY. IF HE WAS/IS SO TOUGH WHY DIDN'T HE TEST ONE OF THE TOUGH JOCKS, LIKE NE OF MY OLD RIDERS, BENNY GREEN. GOOD LUCK AND GETTING AND KEEPING ON TRACK
Lise McLain More than 1 year ago
Hi! Just because Robby claims that he has never hit a woman; pushing and shoving is not appropriate either, and it could be criminal (domestic violence) depending on the injuries. So glad that he attended anger management classes; hopefully he remembers what he has learned from the course and stays out of trouble. I still believe that Robby was cheated when Todd Pletcher and Graham Motion played some "behind the scenes" trickery and had him removed from riding Animal Kingdom in favor of John V. I most certainly do not like dirty tricks being used so, therefore, I do not trust Todd Pletcher and Graham Motion as I still believe they both participated in such trickery. I was pleased to learn that Robby came in second in the Derby with Golden Soul. He beat Todd Pletcher's 5 derby horses. Good for him! Maybe Mr. Pletcher will think twice about pulling dirty tricks in the future. Mr. Pletcher and Mr. Motion ought to be ashamed of themselves for doing this - a clear lack of integrity. Robby, good luck in the Belmont. Thank you! Lise from Maine